Delusional Beliefs Difficult to Dispel: 'The Three Christs'

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ex-l

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Delusional Beliefs Difficult to Dispel: 'The Three Christs'

Post12 Jun 2017

It's bad news but what we knew already ...
“Delusional belief” is hard to dispel. In a 60s study, The Three Christs of Ypsilanti, psychologist Milton Rokeach got three people, all convinced that they were Jesus, to live together for three months. After which they all still thought they were Jesus.

The Three Christs of Ypsilanti (1964) is a book-length psychiatric case study into delusional belief systems by Milton Rokeach. It concerns an experiment on a group of three patients with paranoid schizophrenia who all believed themself to be Jesus Christ; an elderly farmer and alcoholic, a failed writer who was institutionalized after increasingly violent behavior toward his family; and a college dropout and veteran of World War II.

By comparison Lekhraj Kirpalani, an uneducated but Sindhi millionaire jewellery shop owner, he and the Brahma Kumaris only believed himself to be, variously, "higher than God", Brahma, Krishna, Vishnu, Narayan, Dharamraja, and Adam or the Father of Humanity ... *AND* the man who caused 'The Fall' of humanity at the time of the end of the Garden of Eden.

Thinking one is Jesus appears to be modest by comparison ... but I know a BK followers who had a little panic thinking they might be the "Christ soul", as the BKs call him. Perhaps there is a correlation between one's wealth and the scale of one's delusion?

Rokeach brought together the three men, each who claimed to be Jesus Christ, and confronted them with one another's conflicting claims, while encouraging them to interact personally as a support group. He did not, as he had hoped, provoke any lessening of the patients' delusions, but did document a number of changes in their beliefs.

While initially the three patients quarreled over who was holier and reached the point of physical altercations, they eventually each explained away the other two as being patients with a mental disability in a hospital, or dead and being operated by machines.

Rokeach added a comment in the final revision of his book on the study that said, while the experiment did not cure any of the three Christs, "It did cure [him] of my godlike delusion that I could manipulate them out of their beliefs."

A movie based on the book is in the works and slated for release sometime in 2018 starring Julianna Margulies and Richard Gere.

I've heard that one of God's delusions is that he still believes he is Richard Gere.

did not the BKs at one point believe Richard Gere was going to star in a movie about Lekhraj Kirpalani? Or was it Rober Redford?

The BKs will love though ... so many VIPs to target with framed pictures of their god spirit.

Sadly, therefore, still no hope for curing Brahma Kumari followers then ... but, at least, I hope some read this and reflect upon the ridiculousness of their guru's beliefs.
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ex-l

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Re: Delusional Beliefs Difficult to Dispel: 'The Three Chris

Post12 Jun 2017

FYI, Rokeach also established the 'Rokeach Value Survey', published the 'The Nature of Human Values' (1973), an instrument is designed for rank-order scaling of 36 values, including 18 terminal and 18 instrumental values.

That's more than twice the number of values the BK god promoted.

Based on his stufy of people's attitudes, he separated values into "Terminal Values" (referring to the desirable end-states of existence). Goals that people would like to achieve during their lifetime.
    True Friendship, Mature Love, Self-Respect, Happiness, Inner Harmony, Equality, Freedom, Pleasure, Social Recognition, Wisdom, Salvation, Family Security, National Security, a Sense of Accomplishment, a World of Beauty, a World at Peace, a Comfortable Life, and an Exciting Life.
And 'Instrumental Values' (referring to preferable modes of behavior) which were preferable modes of behavior, or means of achieving those terminal values.
    Cheerfulness, Ambition, Love, Cleanliness, Self-Control, Capability, Courage, Politeness, Honesty, Imagination, Independence, Intellect, Broad-Mindedness, Logic, Obedience, Helpfulness, Responsibility, Forgiveness.
These lists seem arbitrary to me and I note, merely being an academic, "he ain't got rhythm, So no one's with him ... (The loneliest man in town)".
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GuptaRati 6666

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Re: Delusional Beliefs Difficult to Dispel: 'The Three Chris

Post15 Jun 2017

A dose of modesty or humility on the BK mortal founder would have contributed to a higher degree of truth and reality, most especially from a Jungian perspective. Jean Shinoda-Bolen's two classics (n.d.): The Goddess In Every Woman and The God in Every Man can explain some Dada Lekraj's experiences. The BKs concept of a super-soul or prophet soul compounding or alloying with the soul of Jesus in the body of Jesus has support from the Bible, mythology investigations, and archaeological research. However, the Edgar Cayce Foundation or Association for Research and Enlightenment (Near Death Experiences and the After-Life, 2016) provides greater details and demonstrate that prior to his role as Jesus, the Jesus soul was Adam. It will be interesting to have Rokeach or one of his students review Harari's book (2017): Homo Deus. It is now possible to use stem cell technology along with the DNA of the Jesus soul and create clones of Jesus. There is the phenomenon of mirroring and/or mimicry consciously and unconsciously (Thompson, 2012). I can recall in the 1980's an English BK Sister who was very famous for her ability to mimic/mirror Jayanti!

References

Harari, Y.N. (2017, March 14). Homo deus. New York, N.Y.: Random House. Retrieved from http://www.ebooksdownloads.xyz/search/homo-deus

Near Death Experiences and the After-Life. (2016). Edgar Cayce on the reincarnation past lives of Jesus Christ. Retrieved from http://www.near-death.com/reincarnation ... jesus.html

Shinoda-Bolen, J. (n.d.). Books by Jean. Retrieved from http://www.jeanshinodabolen.com/jean-books/

Thompson, J. (2012, September 9). Mimicry and mirroring can be good....or bad. Psychology Today. Retrieved from https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/be ... ood-or-bad

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