Debunking BKWSU myths: "first women spiritual leaders"

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Pink Panther

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Re: Debunking BKWSU myths: "first women spiritual leaders"

Post24 Aug 2014

Excellent post ex-l - a wonderful inspiring story. Savitrabai Phule deserves her fame.

- And as it has been told in Murli that the birth one is most likely to achieve fame and be remembered for, it must be her highest, first birth is in 1800s, very low soul :-D ).
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Save Innocents

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Re: Debunking BKWSU myths: "first women spiritual leaders"

Post25 Aug 2014

Very impressive. Thanks ex-l that you highlighted many forgotten women saint & reformists. The collection is itself so nice, just overwhelming.
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ex-l

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Re: Debunking BKWSU myths: "first women spiritual leaders"

Post25 Aug 2014

All of those Indian women totally outclass the Om Mandli Sindis, all of whom have done, collectively, just about zero for anybody else but themselves.

Indeed, they have even gone as far as obstructing good BKs from doing any real good for others.
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Tanya

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Re: Debunking BKWSU myths: "first women spiritual leaders"

Post25 Aug 2014

Very nice compilation ! Going through it made me feel that these women who dedicated their entire life to genuine 'social service' of one or the other kind, would have been inherently 'spiritual'. I mean did they have to join any organisation & do their foundation course, attend regular classes & leave their families only to learn to develop emotions like kindness towards humanity that prompted 'em to do such real social service ? They would have just looked around & observed the miseries of fellow human beings & instead of reminding 'em of their bad karma because of which they were suffering or getting together for an hour & sending out peaceful vibrations, they actually reached out to those people and did 'concrete' work towards uplifting them & making their lives better.

I am myself a believer of the Karmic account theory (of what goes around, comes around ... and BTW, this theory came into existence much before the BKs put their stamp on it) but also believe that it is not enough if you genuinely want to help someone or do something for the society at large.

These women did such selfless social service as they neither wanted to attract followers nor wanted a fat bank balance for themselves. They did not even try to promote themselves aggressively because they were too busy trying to make this world a better place to live.
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Re: Debunking BKWSU myths: "first women spiritual leaders"

Post25 Aug 2014

I think Dadis want to tell everyone that no women spiritual leader like themselves ever happened on Earth who was only after money. They are the first to start this tradition.

Otherwise it is very disturbing belief common to BKs that anything happening good is just because of them. Suppose you go out to help diseased, poor, needy ones, BK would simply refer it as effect of their knowledge on you, though you do not remember.

Dadis try to promote themselves aggressively because they were too busy trying to make BK world, like the Madhubans, Pandav Bhavans, local centers, a better place for bhais & Sister to live & serve Dadis.
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Pink Panther

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Re: Debunking BKWSU myths: "first women spiritual leaders"

Post26 Aug 2014

I disagree SI, money is not the driver.

Like any people in the world, an endless chase for money or position is usually a symptom of personal insecurity.

In the BKs, people do what they do for ”Godly service” in the way they do it (eg bringing in money or bringing in VIP contacts instead of sheltering the homeless or feeding the hungry) because that is the kind of action that brings kudos, validation and recognition, hence nominal promotion in the ”spiritual” hierarchy a.k.a rudra mala. It was this way at least from the time they call ”beggary period”, when all of India was in dire straights after WW2 and partition, the world did not end and Lekhraj Kirpalani’s money ran out.

”Serviceable” souls are those who promote the support structure of the clan, as ex-l has delineated elsewhere - whether by creating converts who then pay their tithe, organising events that generate donations or converts who pay their tithe, producing media that sells to bring in money directly and creates exposure and PR 'talking points’ and sustains the converts who pay their tithe ... and so on.

Nearly all BKs depend on the BK culture and system for their sense of self-worth. The BK culture and system subliminally reinforces the dependence, a closed "circle of life” that lives parasitically off the ”host” - the economic society that the ”householder” BKs interface with to earn a crust.
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Re: Debunking BKWSU myths: "first women spiritual leaders"

Post26 Aug 2014

And there is one more way to see their myths & get rid of it personally. Thousands have said & gone. It does not matter what & how they did to get a position. The facts is anyone whoever gets in power position misuse it at his best, at least most of them did so. This holds true for businessman too. We had an industrial visit & were told that the soft drinks that we purchase for Rs.10 actually cost approx. Rs. 1, but see we are charged 900% more than its actual cost. That is definitely not an ethical business. So, do we need to start a movement to oppose them & their pricing strategies. Not needed though.

So, we can even forget BKism & live happily as we know that there is no need to rejoin it ever. And that is not going to affect us anymore. But the whole mad rush here is to save many others, innocents, who are falling into an empty well hoping fortunes in return.
PP wrote:I disagree SI, money is not the driver.

Right, it is not just one wholly responsible, but it is definitely one of the key drivers. Name, fame, pride, money, sex( it was earlier included in menu, now it is opposed), appraisal, security, etc are major keys & most importantly, it is to continue the cult without disturbing the legacy.

The core target is the religious faith, first BKism divert people from their faith from respective religions & then remains nothing special that would require hard efforts to dismantle any residual belief. Religion is the biggest support of whole society & that is what united people on a very large scale. So, BKs ruin it first & then family, society, individual, morals, etc etc become easy to be turned in any direction they want.
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ex-l

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Re: Debunking BKWSU myths: "first women spiritual leaders"

Post12 Oct 2015

Sophia Duleep Singh - Princess Sophia Alexandra Duleep Singh (8 August 1876 – 22 August 1948) was a prominent suffragette (women's rights activist. Her Father was Maharaja Duleep Singh, son of Maharaja Ranjit Singh who was known as the "Lion of the Punjab". Her godmother was Queen Victoria. Known as a "firebrand feminist", she fashioned herself as an Edwardian lady, though of dark skin.

Secret documents later revealed her identity as a "harridan law breaker" for her diaries revealed that she maintained contacts with the leaders of the Indian nationalist movement like Gopalkrishna Gokhale, Sarala Devi and Lala Lajpat Rai. In the early part of the twentieth century she was one of the leading South Asian women who pioneered the cause of women's rights in Britain.

Best remembered for her leading role in the Women's Tax Resistance League, she also participated in other women's suffrage groups including the Women's Social and Political Union. On 14 June 1928, she became the President of the Committee of the Suffragette Fellowship following the death of its founder Emily Pankhurst. One of her notable achievement was the Royal consent given to the 'Representation of the People (Equal Franchise) Act', which enabled women above the age of 21 to vote on par with men. (Pictured right, below).

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ex-l

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Re: Debunking BKWSU myths: "first women spiritual leaders"

Post16 Oct 2015

Dr. Muthulakshmi Reddy, a women's activist and a social reformer.

The first lady doctor of India, Dr. Muthulakshmi Reddy (30 July 1886, Madras – 22 July 1968) was an eminent medical practitioner, social reformer and Padma Bhushan awardee in India (the third highest civilian award in the Republic of India). She was the first woman legislator in India.

Muthulakshmi was appointed to the Madras Legislative Council in 1927 a nomination which marked the beginning of her lifelong effort to "correct the balance for women by removing social abuses and working for equality in moral standards". In stark opposition to the Brahma Kumaris sucking up the British Monarchy and their criticisms of "Dictator" Gandhi and the traitorous "Crow Race" of Congress, she was one of the women pioneers who stood for the cause of liberating India from the British.

The first female student to be admitted into a men's college, the first woman House Surgeon in the Government Maternity and Ophthalmic Hospital, the first woman legislator in British India, the first Chairperson of the State Social Welfare Advisory Board, the first woman Deputy President of the Legislative Council, and the first Alderwoman of the Madras Corporation Avvai Home.

Her life influence were Mahatma Gandhi, Dr. Annie Besant and Sarojini Naidu (1879 - 1949, the first Indian woman to become the governor of an Indian state and the president of the Indian National Congress in 1925). They persuaded her to devote herself to uplifting women and children. Reddy worked for women's emancipation at a time when women were confined in the four walls of their room.

In 1914, she married Dr. Sundara Reddy on the demand that he promise to "always respect me as an equal and never cross my wishes."

By 1930, she had successfully worked to abolish the devadasi system, liberating women from the pernicious shackles of dedication (and generally prostitution) of young girls to temples. Of the first three devadasi girls to arrive at a shelter she established, one of the girls later became a teacher, another a doctor, and the third a staff nurse.

Although it was initially set up for the protection and education of the liberated girls of the devadasi community, the Avvai Home transformed into a refuge for all women and children who sought protection and education: young widows who refused immolation, deserted wives with their little children who had nowhere to go, orphaned destitute girls, deserted babies and unwed mothers. It was a home to provide protection, food and accommodation without social or caste barriers. It was virtually an ‘open house’. Most of the women and girls who came had very little education and "mother" (Dr. Reddy) educated them in local schools. It grew to be a large educational unit, catering to the most underprivileged. By 1952, by the time the BKs were sitting doing nothing in Mount Abu, a Teacher’s Training Institute was established.

What a start contrast of what was possible as a women in India in comparison to the path of the Brahma Kumaris ... with some credit going to the enlightened support of her Father and the vision and independence of the then Raja of Pudukottai, Martanda Bhairava Thondaman, who overruled objections to allow her to enrol at college.

More information, here.

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